Share This

Bookmark and Share

Monday, August 14, 2017

Author Guest Post - Julianne Holmes

Please welcome to M&MM the author of the Clock Shop Mysteries, Julianne Holmes.  She will have a new series, Theater Cop, start the end of this year.  I reviewed her most recent book, Chime and Punishment (click here.)  


FOR THE LOVE OF CLOCKS

Whenever I explain the premise of my clock shop series—that Ruth Clagan is part of a clock making family who owns a shop in the Berkshires—most people smile, and then they tell me about a clock in their family. Everyone has a clock in their family, I’ve discovered.

For me, it is a mantle clock. I inherited it from my grandmother—a Telechron electric clock that looks a bit like a Seth Thomas. It likely dates from the 50’s, isn’t worth a fortune, but means the world to me. Of course, given the work I’ve done on these books, I am looking for a traditional clock that I must wind.

For some people, longcase clocks are passed down from generation to generation. Keeping them running can be a challenge, especially if they haven’t been moved carefully or maintained over time.  Clockmakers will come in and do a house call to determine what the best course of treatment is for the clock. Now, folks trusted in the craft are few, and I’ve heard stories of people inviting clockmakers to travel or traveling to them for a consult.

Over the course of writing these books, I have fallen a bit in love with Banjo clocks (click here). Simon Willard invented these here in Massachusetts, and patented them in 1802. They continue to be made today. The clock is shaped like a banjo, with a square case on the bottom that can be clear, or can be painted decoratively.

Then there are the Seth Thomas miniatures (click here). I spent a day in the American Clock and Watch museum (click here), and these beauties stopped me in my tracks. Made of different types of wood, different shapes. I can easily see becoming obsessed with them.

I’m sure that there are family banjo clocks, or mantel clocks, or miniatures, or carriage clocks, or others that have been passed on from generation to generation. Do they still work? Hopefully yes, though many could use a good cleaning. While doing my research, and talking to Dave Roberts of the Clockfolk of New England (click here), I’ve come to realize a few things about clock repair. First, that it is a craft that takes years to learn. Second, repair means different things to different people. For some folks, to hold value, that means painstaking authentic repair. For others, it means doing what it takes to get the clock working. The repair may cost more than the value of the clock, but that’s the third thing I’ve learned. Clocks own a place in people’s hearts, and that is priceless.

Do you have a family clock that has been passed down? Does a clock have a place in your memories? 

BIO
Julianne Holmes writes the Clock Shop Mysteries for Berkley Prime Crime. As J.A. Hennrikus, her Theater Cop series will debut in the fall of 2017 with A Christmas Peril. She has short stories in three Level Best anthologies, Thin Ice, Dead Calm and Blood Moon. She is on the board of Sisters in Crime, and is a member of MWA and Sisters in Crime New England. She blogs with the Wicked Cozy Authors and Killer Characters. 

JHAuthors.com | Twitter: @JHAuthors | Instagram: @jahenn

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~

Thank you Ms. Holmes.  I love the ornate craftsmanship of some french clocks, but sadly I don't have a clock that was handed down.  At one point growing up, we had a grandfather clock with the weights that actually worked and winding it.  It had beautiful chimes.  


Bookmark and Share

1 comments:

prince said...

Good taj mahel banane ke lie dolat to milti he magar mohbatt karne ke lie mumtaj nahi milti play bazaar kon kaheta hai taj mahel banane ke lie dolat nahi milti. idea. satta kinig Great .

Related Posts with Thumbnails